We're a geek couple living in PA with our two boys -- Milo and Otis -- who are short, orange, and furry. Oh, and they're the cats we're bookended by! We love movies, TV, comics, books, and comic cons. And, from time to time, we'll share our thoughts on these nerdy things.

Friday, April 14, 2017

Friday 80s Flashback for April 14, 2017

J. Geils: 1946 - 2017

[RIP J. Geils] -- J. Geils, guitarist and leader of the J. Geils band, passed away this week.  I have so many fond memories of the J. Geils Band's music that I had to make them the subject of this week's Flashback post. The band had its roots in the mid-60s as an acoustic blues trio called Snoopy and the Sopwith Camels. By 1968, they had opted for a more electric sound, added a few members, and rebranded themselves as the J. Geils Blues Band. They dropped the "Blues" part of the name by the time they recorded their eponymous debut album in 1970. Their third album, Bloodshot (1973), was their first taste of commercial success. But it wasn't until 1980 that they reached their peak level of success and mainstream popularity. That was shouldered squarely by two records: Love Stinks (1980) and Freeze-Frame (1981). Everyone knows the big hits from those records ("Love Stinks," "Centerfold," and "Freeze-Frame"). So the rest of this Flashback will feature a few of their lesser known tunes. I might be the only person to hold them in as high esteem as their hits, but perhaps you'll come to embrace them as I do. They're waiting for you just after the jump. Feel free to let me know your favorites as well.

Sunday, April 9, 2017

The Heart of Batman (Batman, Vol. 3 #20)

Yeah, Batman is still here. Respect!

The finale of "I am Bane," the fourth arc of writer Tom King's run on Batman, comes to a close in Batman, Vol. 3 #20. Tom King (Omega Men, The Vision, The Sheriff of Babylon) might not have been everyone's pick to follow Scott Snyder, but I know I was psyched about it (I mean, I love, love LOVED his run on Omega Men). And now, after having lit a proverbial fuse about 10 issues ago, this story has paid off in spades. Or batarangs. OK, maybe not batarangs. I don't think a single batarang was thrown in this throwdown between Bane and Batman.

Anyway, if I'm being honest, I'm worried any time Bane is front and center. Not because I'm worried about what will happen to Batman. No, it's because I'm one of maybe a dozen Bat-fans out there who don't really care for this villain who looks, acts, and talks like a professional wrestling trope on steroids. Was that redundant? Maybe. But in the hands of King and the art team, Bane has been almost interesting. And I've been on the edge of my seat with each issue.

So, if you don't care about following a full story and just want a great fight where Batman shows his major gravitas, pick up this single issue. But, if you're interested in a carefully crafted yarn that shows the heart and soul of Batman, read through this entire run from the beginning of Batman Rebirth.


Batman, Vol. 3 #20
April 5, 2017
Tom King (writer)
David Finch and Danny Miki (art)



Weaponize Cuteness (Giant Days #25)


Bobbie: "You can't weaponize cuteness."
Susan: "Watch me."



Giant Days #25
Boom! Studios 
April 5, 2017


Friday, April 7, 2017

Friday 80s Flashback for April 7, 2017


[April 7, 1984] -- Do you remember what you were doing this week in 1984? I know I was still in high school, but I have no specifics. I do, however, recall the tunes in this week's Flashback. Today we're revisiting the three tracks that topped the Billboard Hot 100 on April 7, 1984. We have two soundtrack songs, one of which is a ballad, and a song about paranoia. Man, and wait till you see how prescient that song turned out. Anyway, I'm getting ahead of myself. So, while I take a moment to sort myself, you click the jump so you can read and hear more after the break. 

Saturday, April 1, 2017

Friday 80s Flashback on a Saturday for April 1, 2017


[April Fools'] -- April 1. The 32nd of March. April Fools' (or All Fools) Day. Yes, we have come to that annual observance of mirth and (hopefully minimally destructive and non-lethal) mayhem. You know: The day of reckoning (or, day of pranks and hoaxes). Well, rather than prank you, dear 80s-philes, I shall take pity on you and merely deliver an appropriately "foolish" set of 80s tunes. With an entire decade of artists who often looked the part of fools in addition to acting the role, I have many options. However, rather than looking to the Pucks and jesters who ruled (or attempted to rule) the charts, I chose to narrow my focus to their songs, specifically songs with some form of "fool" in the title. 

What foolishly delightful selections do I have for you this week? Read and hear more after the jump.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Friday 80s Flashback for March 17, 2017



[Human's Lib is 33!] -- Howard Jones' debut album, Human's Lib (1984), was the first compact disc I ever purchased. In fact, I purchased it before I even owned a CD player. You see, I was saving up for the player, and I just wanted to ensure that I had something on hand when I finally connected it to my stereo system. Anyway, Human's Lib was released in the UK on March 17, 1984, and entered the UK Album Charts in the #1 spot. It hit the US in June of that same year. Human's Lib spent a total of 57 weeks on the UK charts and has been certified 2× Platinum. It also went Gold in many European countries and the US. All four singles from this album reached the UK top 20, the first two of which even reached the US top 50. None of that is surprising as this album is so full of 80s pop goodness that just about every track could be considered a true gem. But ... I can choose only three to share with you this week. So which tunes made the cut this week? Read and hear more after the jump.

Friday, March 10, 2017

Friday 80s Flashback for March 10, 2017



[30 Years of The Joshua Tree] -- U2's fifth studio album, The Joshua Tree, was released on March 9, 1987. As you might have gleaned from my Flashback's theme, that record is 30 years old this week! I was in my freshman year at Penn State when this record landed. Before college, I knew all the songs on The Unforgettable Fire (1984), the only U2 record I owned, and the singles off War (1983). But that was it. I had about a four year gap in my U2 knowledge. But a guy down the hall in my dormitory (Holmes Hall) was a huge fan of U2, and his record collection introduced me to the rest of this band's history. Not only that, his enthusiasm for U2 was contagious. So, when The Joshua Tree was announced (by posters and flyers as this was pre-Internet), we began a countdown and waited for its release. He bought a copy on the day the record dropped. We took it back to his room and listened to it, start to finish, twice. Right then, we knew this record was going to propel U2 to the next level of stardom. Of the six singles -- six! -- released from this record, only two failed to chart. Of the charting songs, two peaked at #1, one peaked at #13, and one squeaked into the the #44 slot, all of which on the Billboard Hot 100. And the accolades don't end there. Readers made The Joshua Tree #1 in Rolling Stone's annual Music Awards poll. Critics made it Rolling Stone's #2 album of the year. And it scored two Grammy Awards: (1) Album of the Year and (2) Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal. For this week's Flashback, lets look at some tracks that don't usually get radio play, but probably should. Read and hear more after the jump.